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Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era


Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

Viktor Karady: The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era

New Jewish Identities

 

 

Central European University

 

 

 














Faculty

 
András Kovács more
Michael Miller more
Carsten Wilke more


Professor emeritus
 
Viktor Karady more
 
Current Visiting faculty
 
Shlomo Avineri more
Zsuzsa Hetényi more
Kate Lebow more

 

András KovácsAndrás Kovács (e-mail) is a Professor at the Nationalism Studies and Jewish Studies Program at the Central European University, Hungary, and since 2002 he has been a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Ethnic and Minority Studies at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

Professor Kovacs studied philosophy and history and completed his PhD in sociology at Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest. He has held teaching and research positions at Paderborn University (FRG), École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (Paris), New York University (New York), TH Twente (The Netherlands), Salomon Steinheim Institut für Deutsch-Jüdische Geschichte, Duisburg , Institut für die Wissenschaften vom Menschen, Vienna, Moses Mendelssohn Zentrum für Jüdische Studien, Potsdam , Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften, Wien, Institut für Soziologie, Universitat Wien, Zentrum für Antisemitismusforschung, TU Berlin.

His research interests include minority identities, prejudice, antisemitism, and sociology of post-Holocaust Jewry. In the last years Professor Kovács has carried out empirical research on antisemitism in post-Communist Hungary, on Jewish identity in Hungary and on national identity and European integration. Since 2002, he has been senior researcher at the Institute for Ethnic and Minority Studies at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

He has published over 90 scholarly works, including Anti-Semitism and the Young Elite in Hungary (1996), Antisemitic Prejudices in Contemporary Hungary (1999), Jews and Jewry in Contemporary Hungary: Results of a Sociological Survey (ed., 2004), New Jewish Identities: Contemporary Europe and Beyond (co-editor, 2003), NATO, Neutrality and National Identity: the Case of Austria and Hungary (co-editor, 2003), The Stranger at Hand. Antisemitic prejudices in post-communist Hungary (Brill, Leiden – Boston 2011).

His scholarly publications include:

list of publications

full CV


Courses Taught:

Interpretations of Modern Anti-Semitism

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Michael MillerMichael Miller (e-mail) is Associate Professor in the Nationalism Studies Program at the CEU. He received his Ph.D. in History from Columbia University, where he specialized in Jewish and Central European History. His research focuses on the impact of nationality conflicts on the religious, cultural and political development of Central European Jewry in the nineteenth century. He has contributed to Kotowski, Schoeps, Wallenborn, Handbuch zur Geschichte der Juden in Europa (Darmstadt: Primus Verlag, 2001), Biographisches Handbuch der Rabbiner. Teil 1: Die Rabbiner der Emanzipationszeit (Munich-New York: K.G. Saur, 2004), and the YIVO Encyclopedia of Jews in Eastern Europe. He is author of the book Rabbis and Revolution. The Jews of Moravia in the Age of Emancipation (Stanford University Press, 2010).

Courses Taught:

Paths to Jewish Emancipation
The Emergence of Zionism
Russian and Poland as Multi-National States: The Jews as Case-Study, 1772-1917
Culture, Society and Religion of Eastern European Jewry
Anti-Judaism and Antisemitism in Historical Perspective

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Michael MillerCarsten Wilke (e-mail) is Associate Professor of Jewish Thought and Culture at the CEU. He obtained a PhD in Jewish Studies from the University of Cologne and a diploma in Religious Sciences from the École Pratique des Hautes Études of Paris. He has held teaching positions at the College of Jewish Studies Heidelberg, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, and the Free University of Brussels, and realized research projects at the CNRS in Paris, the Ashkenazi Community in Mexico City, the Steinheim Institute for German Jewish History in Duisburg and the Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies in Philadelphia. His publications on the intellectual and cultural history of European Jewry focus on medieval Jewish mysticism, Jewish-Christian relations, Iberian crypto-Judaism, and 19th century religious modernization.

He authored the books Jüdisch-christliches Doppelleben im Barock (Frankfurt, Peter Lang, 1994), Den Talmud und den Kant: Rabbinerausbildung an der Schwelle zur Moderne, (Hildesheim, Olms, 2003), Biographisches Handbuch der Rabbiner, part. I: Die Rabbiner der Emanzipationszeit in den deutschen, böhmischen und großpolnischen Ländern, 1781-1871 (Munich, Saur 2004), and Histoire des juifs portugais (Paris, Chandeigne 2007; Portuguese translation Lisbon, Ediçőes 70, 2009), which was distinguished with the French Jewish Book Award in 2008. His text editions include posthumous works of the French historian Israël Salvator Révah (2 vols. Paris 2003-2004) and Die Sittenlehre des Judenthums by Elias Grünebaum (Cologne, Böhlau, 2010) and The Marrakesh Dialogues: a Gospel Critique and Jewish Apology from the Spanish Renaissance (Leiden, Brill, forthcoming).

Courses Taught:

Advanced Source Reading: Medieval Hebrew Text Seminar
Intensive Reading Seminar: Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise
Introduction to Medieval Jewish Civilization
Jewish Thought in the Twentieth Century
MA Thesis Seminar II
Medieval Iberian Jewry under Muslim and Christian Rule
Paths to Jewish Emancipation
Problems and Paradigms in Jewish Studies: How to write on Jewish Subjects
Religious and Cultural Transfers Across the Eastern Mediterranean
Sephardic Jewry in Exile, 1492 to the present
Transnationalism and the Jews of the Nineteenth Century
The Emergence of Zionism
Israel: Nation-Building and Society
Excursions into Jewish History and Culture
Judaism and Christianity
Yiddish and the Jewish Uses of German

 

 

Victor KaradyVictor Karady (e-mail) has been educated in Budapest and Paris, with degrees from the Sorbonne in sociology and demography. A member of the European Sociological Center since its foundation, he is emeritus research director with the French National Center for Scientific Research and recurrent visiting professor at the CEU. His main research interests lie in the history of the French universities and social sciences, ethnic and denominational inequalities of modernisation (especially in Central Europe), Jews in European societies since the Enlightenment.

His latest books include Gewalterfahrung und Utopie, Juden in der europäischen Moderne (Frankfurt a. M., Fischer, 1999); co-editor, L'enseignement des élites en Europe Centrale (19e-20e sičcles), (Cracow, Ksiegarnia Akademicka, 1999); (in Hungarian) Self-Identification and Choice of Destiny, Studies in the Historical Transformations of Jewish Identity in Hungary (Budapest, Uj Mandatum, 2001.); (in Hungarian) co-author, Surname and Nation. Ethnic Power Relations and the Movement to Magyarise Alien Surnames from the Vormärz to Communism (Budapest, Osiris, 2002); (in Hungarian) : Survivors and Those Who Start Again, Chapters in the Sociology of Jews in Hungary after 1945 (Budapest, Mult es Jovo, 2002); co-author, The University of Kolozsvar/Cluj and the Students of the Medical Faculty (1872-1918) (Cluj-Budapest-New York, Ethnocultural Diversity Resource Center and CEU Press, 2004); and The Jews of Europe in the Modern Era (Budapest, CEU Press, 2004).

Courses Taught:

Social History of Central European Jewry

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Shlomo AvineriShlomo Avineri (e-mail) is Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institute for European Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Born in Poland in 1933, he has lived in Israel since 1939. He studied at the Hebrew University and the London School of Economics and has held visiting appointments at Yale, Cornell, the University of California, Wesleyan University, Oxford, the Australian National University, the Central European University in Budapest, Cardozo School of Law in New York and Northwestern University.  He was also visiting scholar at the Wilson Center, the Brookings Institution and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (all in Washington D.C.), Collegium Budapest, as well as the Institute of World Economics and International Relations (IMEMO) in Moscow. He is a member of the International Institute of Philosophy. 

His books, which have been translated into many languages, include: The Social and Political Thought of Karl Marx, Karl Marx on Colonialism and Modernization, Hegel's Theory of the Modern State, Israel and the Palestinians, The Making of Modern Zionism, Moses Hess: Prophet of Communism and Zionism, Communitarianism and Individualism (with Avner de-Shalit), The Law of Religious Identity: Models for Post-Communism (with András Sajó), Integration and Identity and Politics and Identities in Transformation (both with Werner Weidenfeld). He recently participated in preparing a Hebrew edition of Theodor Herzl's Diaries and wrote an historical Introduction to the edition. Israel: Nation-Building, Political Development, War and Peace

Courses Taught:

Israel: Nation-Building, Political Development. War and Peace

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Zsuzsa Hetényi
is Professor in the Institute for Slavic Studies at the University ELTE, Budapest, and literary translator (Award by Academy of Sciences, 2002). Among her cca. 350 scholarly articles in six languages she is author of a monographic study about Biblical and messianic motifs in Isaac Babel's Red Cavalry (1991), and the editor and co-author of the History of the Russian Literature (I-II., 1997-2002). Her In the Maelstrom. The history of the Russian-Jewish literature (in Hungarian, 2000, in English 2008), the result of a 10-year research was worked out also thanks to grants given by Swiss Confederation and by the Soros Foundation . Her main fields of research interest are the Russian Prose of the 20th century, dual identity, emigration and bilingualism in literature. Hetényi lectured and gave conference papers in Austria, Croatia, England, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Israel, Lithuania, Russia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the USA. She translated from English to Hungarian Nabokov and Brodsky, from Russian Babel, Bulgakov, Chekhov, Grossman, Kharms, Lunts, Sorokin, Voinovich, Zamyatin, and an anthology of Russian-Jewish prose, 17 authors from Osip Rabinovich to Vladimir Jabotinsky.

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Katherine Lebow (Ph.D., Columbia) has taught the history of East Central Europe and Poland at the University of Virginia and Newcastle University, among others. Her recent publications include Unfinished Utopia: Nowa Huta, Stalinism, and Polish Society, 1949-56 (Cornell, 2013) and The Conscience of the Skin: Interwar Polish Autobiography and Social Rights, Humanity 3:3 (2012), which won the 2013 Aquila Polonica Prize for best English-language article in Polish studies. Currently, she is writing a book about everyman autobiographies in transatlantic space from the Great Depression to the Holocaust.

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Gisele BockYom Tov Assis, a leading scholar on the history of medieval Sephardi Jewry, passed away on June 16, 2013. A professor of medieval Jewish history at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, he headed "Hispania Judaica", the Center for the History and Culture of the Jews in Spain and Portugal, and he served as the head of the university's Dinur Center for Research in Jewish History in 1994-97. Yom Tov Assis has left a legacy of numerous books and articles that have become indispensable for scholars in his field, among them the monographs The Golden Age of Aragonese Jewry (London: The Littman Library, 1997) and Jewish Economy in the Medieval Crown of Aragon, 1213-1327 (Leiden: Brill, 1997). Yom Tov Assis was the editor of the academic journal Hispania Judaica Bulletin, the series Sources for the History of the Jews in Spain and Hispania Judaica; he also directed dozens of collective volumes and source editions. A native of Aleppo, Syria, he was the chairman of the Center for the History and Culture of the Jews of Aleppo and its Surroundings and the chairman of The Ben-Zvi Institute for the Study of the Jewish Communities in the East. Professor Assis lectured in more than 40 countries. Among others, he served as visiting professor at University College London, the Sorbonne, UCLA, Yale, the University of Sydney, Anáhuac University in Mexico, Shandong University in China, and at CEU.

Courses Taught:

Medieval Jewish Life under the Cross and the Crescent

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Michael BrennerMichael Brenner (e-mail) is Professor of Jewish History and Culture at the University of Munich. His publications include The Renaissance of Jewish Culture in Weimar Germany (Yale University Press, 1996), After the Holocaust: Rebuilding Jewish Lives in Post-War Germany (Princeton University Press, 1997), and Zionism: A Brief History (Marcus Wiener Publishers, 2003). He is co-author and co-editor of the four-volume German-Jewish History in Modern Times (Columbia University Press, 1997-98) and co-editor of various other books. He serves as chairman of the Wissenschaftliche Arbeitsgemeinschaft des Leo Baeck Instituts in Deutschland and is a member of the Academic Advisory Committee of the Jewish Museum in Berlin.

Courses Taught:

German-Jewish History from the Enlightenment to the Rise of National Socialism

Major Issues and Debates in Modern Jewish Historiography

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Gisele BockGisela Bock (e-mail) studied in Freiburg, Berlin, Paris, and Rome. She received her Ph.D. at the Free University of Berlin (FUB) in 1971 and her Habilitation at the Technical University of Berlin in 1984. From 1971 to 1983 she taught American History at the John F. Kennedy Institute for North American Studies, then history of National Socialism at the Zentralinstitut für sozialwissenschaftliche Forschung, both at the FUB. She was a fellow at the Center for European Studies, Harvard University (1974-75) and at the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin (1995-96). She taught European history at the European University Institute in Florence (1985-89), gender history at the University of Bielefeld (1989-1987). Since 1997, she has taught European history at the Department of History of the FUB.

Her books include Die "andere" Arbeitsbewegung in den USA von 1905-1922 : Die Industrial workers of the world (Trikont, 1976), Zwangssterilisation im Nationalsozialismus : Studien zur Rassenpolitik und Frauenpolitik (Westdeutscher Verlag, 1986), and Women in European History (Blackwell Publishers, 2002)

Courses Taught:

Women and/in the Holocaust: Europe in the 1930s and 1940s

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Zvi GitelmanZvi Gitelman (e-mail) is Professor of Political Science and Preston R. Tisch Professor of Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. He is also a Research Scientist at the Center for Russian and East European Studies. His current research is on ethnicity and politics. He is especially interested in how states manage multi-ethnic societies, with special reference to the experience of the former USSR and Eastern Europe. He is also conducting an empirical study of ethnic identities among Jews in Russia, Ukraine, Israel and the United States. A third project is the collection, analysis, editing and publication of oral histories of Soviet Jewish veterans of World War Two. The project aims to fill in 'blank spots' in Soviet history and to understand ethnic relations and ethnic motivations in the Soviet armed forces during the war. His publications include Jewish Nationality and Soviet Politics (1972), Becoming Israelis: Political Resocialization of Soviet and American Immigrants (1982), A Century of Ambivalence: the Jews of Russia and the Soviet Union, 1881 to the Present (1988; 2001), Bitter Legacy: Confronting the Holocaust in the USSR (1997), and, as editor, Jewish Life after the USSR (2003).

Course Taught:

The Politics and Culture of Modern East European Jewry

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Moshe IdelMoshe Idel is Professor of Jewish Thought at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He holds a Ph.D. in Kabbalah and has served as visiting professor and researcher at many universities and institutions worldwide, including Yale, Harvard and Princeton Universities in the USA and Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris. His numerous publications include Kabbalah: New Perspectives and Messianic Mystics (both by Yale University Press), and Hassidism: Between Ecstasy and Magic (SUNY, Albany). In 1999, Prof. Idel received the prestigious Israel Prize for excellent achievement in the field of Jewish Philosophy.

Courses Taught:

Approaching Religion

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John KlierJohn Klier (1944-2007)

It is with deep sadness that we inform you of the death of John Doyle Klier on September 23, 2007. John Klier was the Sidney and Elizabeth Corob Professor of Modern Jewish History at UCL, and a recurrent visiting professor in Jewish Studies and Nationalism Studies at CEU. He was an eminent scholar of Russian History, and he will be remembered at CEU for his invaluable contribution to the development of Jewish Studies at this institution. John was an inspiring teacher, a wonderful human being and a dear friend to many at CEU. He will be greatly missed.

For John Klier's obituary on the UCL website, please see:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/news-articles/0709/07092405

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Professor Marsha RozenblitA social and cultural historian of the Jews of Central Europe, Professor Marsha Rozenblit (mrozenbl@umd.edu) has published The Jews of Vienna, 1867-1914: Assimilation and Identity (1984), which also appeared in a German translation (1989). Recently she has written Reconstructing a National Identity: The Jews of Habsburg Austria During World War I (Oxford, 2001), which explores how the Jews, a group profoundly loyal to the multinational Monarchy, coped with the collapse of that supranational state and the creation of nation-states. She has written many articles on Jews in the Habsburg Monarchy and is currently working on Jews and Germans in Moravia, 1848-1938. She served on the editorial boards of the Association for Jewish Studies Review and Jewish Social Studies. She served as Director of the Meyerhoff Center for Jewish Studies from 1998-2003, and is currently a fellow of the American Academy for Jewish Research.

Courses taught:

The Struggle over Identity: The Dilemmas of Jews in Austria-Hungary and Its Successor States

 

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David B. Ruderman is Joseph Meyerhoff Professor of Modern Jewish History and the Director of the Herbert D. Katz Center for Advanced Judaic Studies at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Educated in New York at the Jewish Theological Seminary and at Columbia University, he earned a rabbinical degree from the Hebrew Union College and a Ph.D. in Jewish History from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He held professorships at the Judaic Studies Departments of the University of Maryland and Yale University prior to taking his position at the University of Pennsylvania in 1994.

Professor Ruderman is the author of numerous books and articles, which have decisively contributed to the present reappraisal of Jewish cultural and intellectual creativity in the early modern period. His books include the monograph studies The World of a Renaissance Jew: The Life and Thought of Abraham B. Mordecai Farissol, (1981, National Jewish Book Award in history); Kabbalah, Magic, and Science: The Cultural Universe of a Sixteenth-Century Jewish Physician (1988), Jewish Thought and Scientific Discovery in Early Modern Europe (1995), Jewish Enlightenment in an English Key: Anglo-Jewry's Construction of Modern Jewish Thought (2000, Koret Award for the best book in Jewish History in 2001), Connecting the Covenants: Judaism and the Search for Christian Identity in Eighteenth-Century England (2007), and Early Modern Jewry: A New Cultural History (2010). Professor Ruderman has been president of the American Academy for Jewish Research in 2000-2004 and is the recipient of a lifetime achievement award for his work in Jewish history from the National Foundation for Jewish Culture.

Courses taught:

Topics in Early Modern Jewish History

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Ivan SandersIvan Sanders (ivansanders@mailbox.hu) is Professor Emeritus of English at Suffolk College, SUNY, and Adjunct Professor at Columbia University's East Central European Center. He has also taught at the New School University, the Central European University and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. He is the prize-winning translator (Füst Milán Prize, Déry Tibor Prize, Soros Translation Award) of works by George Konrád, Péter Nádas, Péter Esterházy, Miklós Mészöly, Ádám Bodor and others. His studies and essays on Jewish literary topics have appeared in Judaism, Jewish Social Studies, Soviet Jewish Affairs, The Hungarian Quarterly, Múlt és Jövő and other journals.

Courses taught:

Assimilation and its Discontents: Central European Jewish Writers

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Frank Stern (e-mail) studied at the Free University Berlin, the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, and received his PhD from Tel-Aviv University where he taught Modern History and Culture. From 1997 to 2004 Professor for Modern German History and Culture and director of the Center for German Studies and the Austrian-German Studies Program at Ben-Gurion University in Beer-Sheva, Israel, and 2002 Acting Chair at the Department of Film and Television at Sapir College, Sederot. Visiting Professor at Columbia University in the City of New York, at Georgetown University, Washington DC, at Humboldt University Berlin, and at Vienna University. Since 2004 teaching cinema and cultural history at the Institute for Contemporary History at Vienna University.

He published widely on postwar Germany, on problems of philosemitism and anti-Semitism (“the Whitewashing of the Yellow Badge”), on American-German-Israeli relations, on German-Jewish issues, and particularly on German, Austrian and US-American film.

He was academic consultant for exhibitions on Jewish life and antisemitism in Vienna and Berlin, and curated a number of film retrospectives on German, Austrian, Israeli and Jewish films in Israel and Austria. In 2002, he published “Dann bin ich um den Schlaf gebracht. Ein Jahrtausend jüdisch-deutsche Kulturgeschichte,” in February 2003 he coedited “Die deutsch-jüdische Erfahrung. Beiträge zum kulturellen Dialog, and in October 2004 he coedited „Ludwig Börne – Deutscher, Jude, Demokrat“ with the Aufbau Publishing House in Berlin.

Recent publications include articles and chapters on
• the Holocaust in film,
• Challenges of historical film analysis,
• German-language films from 1930 to 1950: propaganda and entertainment,
• Gender and film in the 1920s and 1930s,
• Problems of the Representation of Jewish topics on the screen.
• Arthur Schnitzler and film: the poet of acculturation Course taught: Being Jewish in European and American Cinema 1914 to 2006

Courses Taught:

Being Jewish in European and American Cinema 1914-2006

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Yael (Yuli) TamirYael Tamir was born in Israel in 1954. She holds a Ph.D. in Liberal Nationalism from Oxford University. Tamir is a Professor of Political Philosophy at Tel-Aviv University and a Research Fellow at the Hartman Institute of Jewish Studies. She is a member of the board of the Jerusalem Foundation and of the Israel Institute of Democracy. Prof. Tamir has authored a number of books and articles on various subjects, including liberalism, nationalism, and feminism. From 1980-1985 she was active in the Ratz party (now part of Meretz) and was one of the founders of the Peace Now movement. Since 1995, she has been active in the Labor Party. Yael Tamir served as Minister of Immigrant Absorption from August 1999 until March 2001. Her major book, Liberal Nationalism (Studies in Moral, Political, and Legal Philosophy) was first published in 1995.

Course Taught:

Can Liberal Nationalism be implemented? The Israeli Test-Case


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