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Curriculum Research Fellowships
Research projects supported in 2007-2008


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Gabriel Andreescu, Igor Casu, Béla Révész:
The Ethics and Politics of Memory in Universities of Romania, Hungary and Republic of Moldova
Dmitry Borodin:
Making Sense of Russia's "Unpredictable Past": Russian History Courses in the Curricula of Provincial State Universities
Alexander Kamenskiy, Galina Zvereva:
History curricula development and curriculum design practices in Russian higher education
Maria Nakonechna:
Comparative Analysis of Psychology Curricula in Ukraine
Ludmila Popkova, Irina Tartakovskaya:
Gender Studies Curriculum Development in the Post-Soviet Countries of Central Asia (Cases of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan)
Zdravomyslova Elena, Temkina Anna:
Gender curricula in Russia: informal input and formalization


Project title:

The Ethics and Politics of Memory in Universities of Romania, Hungary and Republic of Moldova

Research team:

Gabriel Andreescu (team leader), National School for Political Studies and Public Administration, Bucharest, Romania
Igor Casu , Moldova State University, Chisinau
Béla R évész, University of Szeged, Hungary

Brief overview of the research project:

During post-communist years,university curricula began to accommodate courses on inter-war authoritarianism, the Holocaust, communist regimes, more generally, totalitarian systems, and have had to deal with the delicate issues raised by the interpretation of such regimes. The research assesses the way in which academic curricula treat the totalitarian past from the perspective of the ethics and politics of memory, and the extent to which they have followed cultural and political trends.

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Project title:

Making Sense of Russia’s “Unpredictable Past”: Russian History Courses in the Curricula of Provincial State Universities

Researcher:

Dmitry Borodin, Tver State University

Brief overview of the research project:

The goal of the research is to assess the changes which took place in the university syllabi on the Russian History within the last 5 -7 years in the context of the ongoing educational reform.

The need of the proposed research grew out of the fact that there exists a discrepancy between the officially stated goals of the educational reform and the way it is actually conducted. Courses on the Russian History are a good example of this discrepancy. First, while it is being declared that Russia is a European country, the content of the courses becomes more and more anti-European and the general appraisals more conservative. Second, while the state officials declare that the country is moving towards post-industrial economy based on knowledge, the methods of dissemination of the knowledge still remain those of the modern age: teaching is preferred to learning and standard mandatory history courses (which are still regarded as a very powerful tool of ideological indoctrination) are believed to produce real patriots.

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Project title:

History curricula development and curriculum design practices in Russian higher education

Research team:

Alexander Kamenskiy (team leader), Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow Galina Zvereva , Russian State University for the Humanities, Moscow

Brief overview of the research project:

The main goal of the project is to present an analytical picture of curriculum design in world history in today’s Russia. The need for such research is preconditioned by two factors. First, history education in Russia has long been the topic of public debate as well as political manipulation as there exists a deep realization of its importance in context of constructing new Russian identity, citizenship and loyalty. Second, among the academic media there exists a clear understanding that with entering the Bologna process the traditional Russian system of history education, curriculum design and teaching practices will not survive.

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Project title:

Comparative Analysis of Psychology Curricula in Ukraine

Researcher:

Maria Nakonechna, Nizhyn Gogol State University , Ukraine

Brief overview of the research project:

Till the collapse of the Soviet Union, psychology curricula in Ukraine were concentrated on theoretical issues, very little attention was given to the practical preparation of future psychologists. Ukrainian psychologists got acquainted with practical and applied psychology developed in the West only in the 1990s. Ukrainian psychology is still paying the price of this isolation, as the generations that are now controlling the departments and the research institutions are often not acquainted with modern and contemporary psychological schools and investigations in the West. This research intends to study how the social and historical context in different regions of Ukraine influences the construction of the Psychology Curriculum.

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Project title:

Gender Studies Curriculum Development in the Post-Soviet Countries of Central Asia (Cases of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan)

Research team:

Ludmila Popkova , Gender Studies Center, Samara State University
Irina Tartakovskaya , Gender Studies Center, Samara State University

Brief overview of the research project:

Gender studies in post-Soviet countries were formed as an academic discipline only during the last fifteen years. It was a period of intensive development, starting with the very beginning. Nowadays courses on gender problems, varied in length and level, are being conducted in all post-Soviet countries. However the introduction of the new discipline has met and still meets a lot of serious problems, such as unstable national education systems in the period of intensive changes, academic conventionalism and unflexibility, and to crown it all, ideological struggle for women’s role in politics and culture of every state. Nowadays in no post-Soviet state gender studies are included into the state educational standard for the Humanities.

The goal of the research isto find out the peculiarities of institutionalization and curriculum development of gender studies in two post-Soviet Central Asian countries in the first decade of the 21 st century.

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Project title:

Gender curricula in Russia: informal input and formalization

Research team:

Zdravomyslova Elena , European University Saint-Petersburg, Gender Studies Program Temkina Anna, European University Saint-Petersburg, Gender Studies Program

Brief overview of the research:

The research investigates the development of Russian gender studies from the sociology of knowledge perspective. The focus is on the educational practices in gender studies – curricula and didactic interactions. The project explores two processes. First - the role of summer schools of 1990s as informal input (enthusiastic phase) for the development of education in gender studies. Second – adaptation of gender studies in the state university environment (negotiations, compromises, de-radicalization). It analyzes how social networks of gender researchers became institutionalized and what are the consequences of this process. The conceptual model is the idea of research laboratory (in sociology of knowledge of B. Latour): the concept of ‘actant’ is used to explore institutional forms, didactics, means of scholarly communication and content of the educational programs.




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