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   Course Title    Introduction to Social Policy
Lecturer    Natalia Y. Astapova
Institution    Zaporizhzhia Institute of State and Municipal Administration
Country    Ukraine


The purpose of the course is to take a broad view of social policy considering the subject from a number of perspectives. The course refers to the experience of transitional Ukraine in reforming its Social Safety Net and discusses the socio-cultural environment which shapes welfare system design. The course introduces a new academic discipline to Ukrainian Social Science education and provides future policy makers, policy analysts, and social workers with theoretical knowledge and practical skills which are necessary for sound decision making in the social policy field.

Objectives of the Course

  • To provide students with a basic knowledge of social policy theory and practice
  • To refer to the Ukrainian experience in social policy reform during transition
  • To enhance awareness of the goals of social policy and the conflicts that arise between them; of the constraints within which policy operates; of differences in the interpretation of the nature of social problems; of issues that arise in the implementation of policies; and of the potential and limitations of services and policies of different types
  • To deepen the understanding of specific historical and cultural bases of contemporary welfare states

The Role of the Course in the Degree Curriculum

Introduction to Social Policy is a new course in the Social Work Degree Curriculum of the University. Since the course offers knowledge in social policy making and implementation and provides students with policy implementation and policy analysis skills, it is very important in the education of the future public sphere professionals and NGO activists working on social programs design and implementation.

Course Requirements

Students are expected

  • to attend all lectures and seminars;
  • to participate actively in the discussions;
  • to approach information critically and creatively;
  • to work in small groups to present topics for each seminar;
  • to sit two written exams during the semester.

Assessment

Grades will be based on the following:

50% - in-class participation
25% - mid-term exam
25% - final exam

Methods Used

Preference is given to active learning methods, which expect students to be actively involved in both lectures and seminars. Among the methods used are:

  • small group discussion;
  • group case study;
  • group case presentation;
  • interactive computer exercises;
  • Internet exercises;
  • graphic information analysis;
  • role-games;
  • solution of real-life problems;
  • social programs designing;
  • short-term on-the-job training.

These methods are expected:

  • to activate students’ knowledge;
  • to teach students to produce/find information independently;
  • to practice/acquire new skills.

Structure of the Course

The course consists of two major parts. The first part of the course is devoted to the theory of Social Policy making. The second part of the course is concentrated on Ukraine, its present day Social Policy situation and the options for welfare reform.

MODULE I: THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR SOCIAL POLICY MAKING AND IMPLEMENTATION

Week I Introduction

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. What is Social Policy
  2. The Development of Social Policy

These introductory sessions will focus on the discussion of why welfare states appeared and how social policies work and introduce key concepts of the course. Apart from discussion of welfare state, methods of social policy intervention and models of welfare, the historical development of social policy will be discussed. A large proportion of the time will be devoted to the politics of welfare, including models of welfare politics, key players, etc.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Bryson L., Welfare and the State. London: Macmillan,1992.
  2. Cahill M., The New Social Policy. Oxford: Blackwell, 1994.
  3. Deakin N., The Politics of Welfare: Continuities and Change. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1994.
  4. Esping-Andersen G., The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1990.
  5. George V., and Miller S., (eds.), Social Policy Towards 2000: Squaring the Welfare Circle. London: Routledge, 1994.
  6. George V., and Wilding P., Welfare and Ideology. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1994.
  7. Johnson N., The Welfare State in Transition: The Theory and Practice of Welfare Pluralism. Brighton: Wheatsheaf Books, 1987.
  8. Macarov D., Social Welfare: Structure and Practice. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage, 1995.
  9. Manning N., Social Problems and Welfare Ideology. London: Gower, 1985.
  10. Pierson C., Beyond the Welfare State? The New Political Economy of Welfare. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1991.
  11. Sullivan M., The Politics of Social Policy. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1992.
  12. Timmins N., The Five Giants: A Biography of the Welfare State. London: Fontana, 1995.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Lis C., and Soly H., Poverty and Capitalism in Pre - Industrial Europe. Brighton: Harvester Press, 1982.
  2. Mead L. M., Beyond Entitlement: The Social Obligations of Citizenship. London: Free Press, 1987.
  3. Mishra R., The Welfare State in Crisis. Brighton: Wheatsheaf, 1984.
  4. Rimlinger G., Welfare Policy and Industrialization in Europe, America, and Russia. New York: Wiley, 1971.

Week II Demographic Trends and Their Implications for Social Policy

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Ageing of the Population.
  2. Changing Family Patterns.
  3. Social Need, Demographic Facts, and Policy Judgments.

The sessions focus on demographic trends and their impact on social policy address, the aging of the population and its consequences for social security and healthcare; the decline of the ‘male-breadwinner’ model of family and its implications for social security and community care; an increase in divorces and lone parent families and the decline in the number of marriages and their effect on social security and childcare, etc. The problem of the definition of ‘social need’ will be discussed and its implications for social policy analyzed.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Doyal L., and Gough I., A Theory of Human Need. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1991.
  2. Ermisch J., Fewer Babies, Longer Lives. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 1990.
  3. Hills J., The Future of Welfare: A Guide to the Debate. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 1993.
  4. Kiernan K., and Wicks M., Family Change and Future Policy. York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 1990.
  5. Smith G., Social Needs: Policy Practice and Research. London: Routledge, 1988.

Recommended Readings:

1. Finch J., and Mason J., Negotiating Family Responsibilities. London: Routledge, 1993.

Week III Economic Context for Social Policy Making and Implementation

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Political Economy of Welfare.
  2. Employment, Earnings and Unemployment.
  3. Inequality, Poverty and Social Exclusion.

The session will cover the issues related to the relationship of Economics to Social Policy, in particular, the question of efficiency and welfare; ‘market failure’ as the main economic justification for government intervention in societies with established market economies; the construction and implementation of particular social policies, etc. The aim of these sessions is to help students understand the economics of social policy.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Barr N., The Economics of the Welfare State. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.
  2. Culyer A., The Political Economy of Social Policy. London: Martin Robertson, 1980.
  3. Glennerster H., Paying for Welfare: Towards 2000. London: Harvester Wheasheaf, 1997.
  4. Le Grand J., Propper C., and Robinson R., The Economics of Social Problems. London: Macmillan, 1993.

Week IV Social Policy Implementation - An Overview

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Public Expenditure Decision Making.
  2. Cash Transfers.
  1. The Origins of Modern Social Security Systems;
  2. Direct and Indirect Forms of Transfer;
  3. Categories of Cash Transfer.

These sessions address the definition and the role of public expenditure, its recent growth in many industrialized countries, and, as a result, the attempts to control and reduce public expenditure and to reform its structure in many countries. The other area, which is covered during these sessions is cash transfers and their main categories: Social Insurance Benefits; Social Assistance Benefits; Categorical Benefits; Discretionary Benefits; Occupational Benefits and Fiscal Transfers.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Baldock J., Manning N., Miller S., and Vickerstaff S., (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  2. Baldwin S., Falkingham J., (eds.), Social Security and Social Change. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1994.
  3. Corry D., (ed.), Public Expenditure: Effective Management and Control. London: The Dryden Press, 1997.
  4. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999
  5. Glennerster H., Paying for Welfare: The 1990s. London: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1992.
  6. Mullard M., The Politics of Public Expenditure, London: Routledge, 1993.
  7. Spicker P., Stigma and Social Welfare. Beckenham: Croom Helm, 1984.
  8. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Deacon A., and Bradshaw J., Reserved for the Poor: The Means - Test in British Social Policy. Oxford: Basil Blackwell and Martin Robertson, 1983.
  2. Walker C., Managing Poverty: The Limits of Social Assistance. London: Routledge, 1993.

Week V Social Policy Implementation: Education and Training

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Education and Training: Concepts and Definitions.
  2. Social Policy Goals in Education and Training.
  3. Education and Training Policy for Different Age Groups.

The sessions are devoted to education and focus on social and economic functions of education and training; the role of social and public policy in education; the problem of costs and access to education and training; the problems of transition from school to work and the question of adult education.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Aldcroft D., Education, Training and Economic Performance. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1992.
  2. Baldock J., et al. (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  3. Mizen P., The State, Young People and Youth Training. London: Mansell, 1995.
  4. Ryan P., (ed.), International Comparisons of Vocational Education and Training for Intermediate Skills. London: The Falmer Press, 1991.

Recommended Readings:

  1. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999.
  2. Green A., and Steedman H., Educational Provision, Educational Attainment and the Needs of Industry: A Review of Research for Germany, France, Japan, the USA and Britain. London: National Institute of Economic and Social Research, 1993.
  3. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Week VI Social Policy Implementation: Health and Health Policy

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

1. Systems of Healthcare Provision.

2. Imperatives for Healthcare Reform:

  1. External imperatives (demographic change; development in medical technology; rising patients’ expectations; impact of social development)
  2. Internal Imperatives (changing patterns of disease; limitations to health gain; rising inequalities in healthcare; the escalation of healthcare costs; inadequate cost-effectiveness; inefficient healthcare system performance)

3. Options for Healthcare Reform

The workshop, devoted to healthcare and health policy, will discuss socio-economic determinants of health in society; the existing systems of healthcare provision; the rising costs of healthcare in the industrialized countries and the problem of controlling costs; the problems of effectiveness and unequal access to high-quality healthcare; the issues of health promotion and disease prevention; imperatives for healthcare reform in many countries; and the development of organizational structures responding to external and internal pressures on healthcare systems.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Abel-Smith B., and Mossialos E., Cost Containment and Health Care Reform. London: LSE European Institute, 1994.
  2. Baldock J., et al. (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  3. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999.
  4. OECD, Health Care Reform: the Will to Change. Health Policy Studies No. 8, Paris: OECD, 1996.
  5. Saltman B., and Figueras J. European Health Care Reform. WHO, 1997.
  6. Wilkinson R., Unhealthy Societies: The Affliction of Inequality. London: Routledge, 1996.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Blaxter M., Health and Lifestyles. London: Routledge, 1990.
  2. European Commission, Health Technology Assessment in Europe: the Challenge of Co-ordination, EC, 1999
  3. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Week VII Social Policy Implementation: Social Care and Child Care

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Disability and Disability Policy.
  2. Institutional Arrangements of Elderly Care.
  3. Foundations of Child Care Systems.
  4. Child Abuse.

The discussion of social care will include such topics as demographic trends challenging community care; disability and disability policy; the issue of informal care; community care for old and disabled people. Institutional arrangements of social care will be discussed along with the recent developments in this area.

The session devoted to the care and protection of children will address the foundations of the modern child care systems, the causes and consequences of child abuse (including physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect and emotional abuse); the issues of adoption and other child services.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Arber S., and Ginn J., (eds.) Connecting Gender and Ageing: A Sociological Approach. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1995.
  2. Arber S., and Ginn J., Gender and Later Life: A Sociological Analysis of Resources and Constraints. London: Sage, 1991.
  3. Baldock J., et al. (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  4. Berridge D., Children’s Homes. Oxford: Blackwell, 1985.
  5. Brown H., and Smith H., (eds.) Normalization: A Reader for the Nineties. London: Routledge, 1992.
  6. Corby B., Child Abuse: Towards a Knowledge Base. Buckingham: Open University Press, 1993.
  7. Dingwall R., Eekelaar J., and Murray T., The Protection of Children: State Intervention and Family Life. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1983.
  8. Finch J., Family Obligations and Social Change. Cambridge: Polity, 1989.
  9. Fox Harding L., Perspectives in Child Care Policy. London: Longman, 1991.
  10. Gil D., Violence Against Children. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1970.
  11. Hotchschild A., The Managed Heart: The Commercialization of the Human Feelings, Berkeley, Calif.: University of California, 1983.
  12. Lewis J., and Glennerster H., Implementing the New Community Care. Buckingham: Open University, 1996.
  13. Oliver M., The Politics of Disablement. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1990.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Doyle C., Working with Abused Children. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1997.
  2. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999.
  3. Madge N., Children and Residential Care in Europe. London: National Children’s Bureau, 1994.
  4. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Week VIII Social Policy Implementation: Housing and Housing Policy

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. The History and Evolution of Housing Policy.
  2. The Goals and Objectives of Housing Policy.
  3. The Main Instruments of Housing Policy.

Housing and housing policy sessions will focus on the European housing patterns; the history and evolution of housing policy; the problem of homelessness; and public spending on housing. It will be shown that housing policy in many countries is not simply or even primarily aimed at those in greatest housing need and that housing policy is usually driven by other policy goals.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Baldock J., et al. (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  2. Dorling J., Comparative Housing Policy. London: Macmillan, 1997.
  3. Kleinman M., Housing, Welfare and the State in Europe. Aldershot: Edward Elgar, 1996.
  4. Lee P., and Murie A., Poverty, Housing Tenure and Social Exclusion. Bristol: Policy Press, 1997.
  5. Malpass P., and Murie A., Housing Policy and Practice. London: Macmillan, 1994.
  6. McCrone G., Stephens M., Housing Policy in Britain and Europe. London: UCL Press, 1995.

Recommended Readings:

  1. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999.
  2. Gilbert A., and Gugler J., Cities, Poverty and Development. Urbanization in the Third World. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1992.
  3. Harrison M..L., Housing: Race, Social Policy and Empowerment. Aldershot: Avebury, 1995.
  4. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Week IX The Impact of Social Policy

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. The Impact of Social Policy on Individual Households.
  2. The Impact of Social Policy on Society.

These sessions discuss the consequences and outcomes of Social Policy. Firstly, the problem of measuring the impact of social policy is addressed. Secondly, the impact of Social Policy on individual households is discussed particularly in application to healthcare, education, housing, personal social services. Special attention is paid to Social Security (benefit levels, take-up, the impact of cash benefits). Thirdly, the implications of Social Policy for society and social stability are discussed.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Baldock J., et al. (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  2. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999.
  3. George V., and Wilding P., The Impact of Social Policy. London: Routledge, 1984.
  4. Glennerster H., and Hills J., (eds.), The State of Welfare. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1998.
  5. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Davies B. P., Social Needs and Resources in Social Services. London: Michael Joseph, 1968.
  2. International Labour Organisation, Into the Twenty-first Century: The Development of Social Security. Geneva: International Labour Office Publications Branch, 1984.

Week VIII The Future of Social Policy

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Pressures on Welfare Provision.
  2. Arguments for New Forms of Welfare.

The sessions are devoted to what is often referred to as ‘crisis of welfare state’ and the possible options for reform. Among others, the following questions are discussed: the crisis of confidence in welfare; the growing demand for welfare resulting in rising costs, the pressures on welfare provision (the changes in international political economy, new styles of economic organization, etc.) After the discussion of the pressure on welfare systems and imperatives for reform the possible reform options are discussed.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Baldock J., et al. (eds.), Social Policy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999.
  2. Esping-Andersen G., Welfare States in Transition. London: Sage, 1996.
  3. European Commission, Social Protection Expenditure and Receipts: European Union, Iceland, and Norway. Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities, 1999.
  4. Glennerster H., Paying for Welfare: The 1990s. Hemel Hempstead: Wheatsheaf, 1992.
  5. International Labour Organisation, Into the Twenty-first Century: The Development of Social Security. Geneva: International Labour Office Publications Branch, 1984.
  6. Pierson C., Beyond the Welfare State? Cambridge: Polity, 1998.
  7. Pierson P., Dismantling the Welfare State? Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.
  8. Sykes R, and Alcock P, Developments in European Social Policy. Convergence and Diversity. Bristol: The Policy Press, 1998.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Giddens A., Beyond Left and Right. Cambridge: Polity, 1994.
  2. Giddens A., The Third Way. Cambridge: Polity, 1998.

MODULE II: SOCIAL POLICY IN TRANSITION: UKRAINE

Week IX Pre-independence Social Policy and Labor Market Situation

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Pre-transition Social Protection System.
  2. Pre-independence Labor Market Distortions.
  3. Regional Dimension of Unemployment.

The sessions focus on social policy regime in Ukraine before the transition. They also address the social and labor market situation and discuss how it shaped and should have shaped welfare reform in the country. As the system of social protection in Ukraine was, and is, employment-related, special attention is paid to pre-transition labor market situation and its developments, particularly to the pre-transition labor force participation, mobility of labor, employment structure, etc.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. ILO-CEET, Labour Market Dynamics in Ukrainian Industry: Results from the Ukrainian Labour Flexibility Survey, ILO-CEET Paper No.7, Budapest, 1994.
  2. ILO-CEET, Mission Report, Ukraine, May 1993.
  3. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, (ILO-CEET), The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 2: Labor Market Developments in Ukraine, pages: 29 - 74)
  4. International Labour Organization and Ministry of Labour of Ukraine, Economies in Transition and Employment Problem: The Role of Cooperatives and Associative Enterprises, Report of an International Seminar, Kiev, May 11-14, 1993.
  5. Libanova E., and Revenko A., Public Policy and Social Conditions in Ukraine during 1989-1993. Paper prepared for UNICEF. Kiev, 1993.

Recommended Readings:

  1. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

Week X Employment, Unemployment and Labor Policy Reform

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Revising the Labor Code.
  2. Institutional Framework.
  3. Employment Programs for 1993, and 1994.
  4. The Concept of the State Program of Youth Employment Promotion for 1994-1995.
  5. The Concept of the State System of Vocational Guidance
  6. National Program of Social (Public) Works.
  7. Assessment of Labor Market Policies.

These sessions address the issue of labor market policy reform. The discussion starts with legislative and institutional framework for labor market policy and discusses employment programs for 1993 (objectives, implementation, and assessment) and for 1994 (main issues of the program: small business and self-employment promotion, territories of preferential development, social works, training and labor market institutions), the concept of the State Program of youth employment promotion for 1994-1995, the concept of the State System of Vocational Guidance, and National Program of Social (Public) Works.

Mandatory Reading:

  1. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 3: Creating Labor Market Policies, pages: 75 - 127)
  2. International Labour Organization and Ministry of Labour of Ukraine, Economies in Transition and Employment Problem: The Role of Cooperatives and Associative Enterprises, Report of an International Seminar, Kiev, May 11-14, 1993.
  3. Jatsenko V., Employment Policy in Ukraine in 1991 - 1994. Paper presented at ILO Conference on Employment Policy and Programmes, Budapest, June 2-3, 1994.
  4. Libanova E., The Ukrainian Labour Market: Problems and Perspectives (Ukrainskiy rynok truda: problemy i perspectyvy). International Institute of Market Relations and Entrepreneurship, Kiev, 1993.
  5. Ministry of Statistics, Labour in the Ukrainian National Economy (Pracya v narodnomu gospodarstvi Ukrainy). Kiev, 1993.
  6. Shamota V., An Analysis of Ukrainian Labour Market and Efficiency of the State Employment Policy. Background paper prepared for the Ukrainian COR, Kiev, 1994.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Ministry of Labour of Ukraine and State Employment Service, On Execution of the State Programme of Population Employment in 1993 (Pro vykonannya derzhavnoi programmy zaynyatosti naselennya na 1993 rik). Kyiv, 1993.
  2. Ministry of Labour of Ukraine, Basic Conceptual Issues of Elaboration of the State Programme of Youth Employment for the Years 1994-95 (Osnovni contseptualni polozhennya rozrobky proektu derzhavnoyi programy spryyannya zaynyatosti molodi na 1994-1995 roky). Kyiv, August 1993.
  3. Ministry of Labour of Ukraine, Basic Conceptual Principles of Project Elaboration of the State Programme for Youth Employment Promotion in 1994-95 (Osnovni pryntsypy rozrobky proektu tsilevoyi derzhavnoyi programy spryyannya zaynyatosti molodi na 1994-95 roky). Kyiv, August 1993.
  4. Ministry of Labour of Ukraine. State Programme of Employment for 1994 (Derzhavna programa zaynyatosti naselennya na 1994 rik). Kyiv, February 23, 1994.
  5. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

 

Week XI Wage Policy Reform

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Changes in the Wage Determination System.
  2. Social Aspects of Wage Policy Reform:
    1. The Fall of Real Wages.
    2. Downward Pressure on the Minimum Wage.
    3. Disruption of the Income Structure
  3. Economic Aspects of Wage Policy Reform: High Inflation and Low Productivity.
  4. Policy Recommendations.

The sessions address the issues of the wage policy reform, social problems connected with it (such as, drastic fall in purchasing power and growing poverty) and economic aspects (growing wage differentials, adverse effects on consumption) and especially policy recommendations (flexible indexation system, linking wages to productivity and economic performance, disconnecting average wages and social benefits from the minimum wage).

Mandatory Readings:

  1. Decree on Targeted Cash Benefits to Low Income Persons, No. 394, Ukraine, June 14, 1993.
  2. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 4: Reforming Wage Policy in a Hyper-Inflationary Context, pages: 127 - 153)
  3. Kulikov G., Remuneration System: Reforms and Needs. Report for the ILO, Institute of Economics, Kiev, ILO-CEET, Budapest, April 1994.
  4. Standling G., Vaughan-Whitehead D., Minimum Wages in Central and Eastern Europe: from Protection to Destitution. Budapest: CEU Press, 1995
  5. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

 

Week XII Social Protection in Ukraine

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. History of the Social Protection in Ukraine.
  2. Living Standards, Poverty and Social Protection in Ukraine.

The sessions focus on social protection history and traditions in Ukraine; the analysis of the system of social protection inherited from the Soviet Union, and imperatives for reform. The present day social situation is addressed and policy priorities are identified and discussed.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. IMF, Ukraine: Budgetary Implications of Social Safety Net Options. Washington D. C., November, 1992.
  2. Institute of Sociology, Academy of Science, Socioeconomic and Political Situation in Ukraine’s Regions. Kiev, mimeo, 1994.
  3. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 7: The Challenge of Social Protection, pages: 240 - 295)
  4. The World Bank, Ukraine: Employment, Social Protection and Social Spending in the Transition to a Market Economy. Washington D. C., November 1992.
  5. The World Bank, Ukraine: The Social Sectors During Transition, Washington D. C., 1993.
  6. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Matthews M., Poverty in the Soviet Union. The Lifestyles of the Underprivileged in Recent Years. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1986

 

Week XIII Social Protection System Reform: Pensions and Unemployment Benefits

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Pension System Reform.
  2. Unemployment Compensation System Reform.

The sessions focus on problems and challenges to pension and unemployment compensation systems reform in Ukraine. It also discusses options for reform and addresses the issues of benefits level, institutional and administrative arrangements, etc.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 7: The Challenge of Social Protection, pages: 250 - 258)
  2. The World Bank, Ukraine: Employment, Social Protection and Social Spending in the Transition to a Market Economy. Washington D. C., November 1992.
  3. The World Bank, Ukraine: The Social Sectors During Transition, Washington D. C., 1993.
  4. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

 

Week XIV Social Protection System Reform: Family Benefits, Healthcare System and Social Assistance

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. The Family Benefit Scheme Reform.
  2. Healthcare System Reform.
  3. Social Assistance System Reform:
    1. Income Support Benefit;
    2. Social Care.

The sessions focus on the reform of social assistance, healthcare and family benefits systems and discuss how the reform should be planned and implemented in order to preserve the positive features of the old system and introduce new elements to raise efficiency and reduce costs.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 7: The Challenge of Social Protection, pages: 262 - 268)
  2. The World Bank, Ukraine: Employment, Social Protection and Social Spending in the Transition to a Market Economy. Washington D. C., November 1992.
  3. The World Bank, Ukraine: The Social Sectors During Transition, Washington D. C., 1993.
  4. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

Recommended Readings:

1. Decree on Targeted Cash Benefits to Low Income Persons, No. 394, Ukraine, June 14, 1993.

 

Week XV Social Protection System Reform: Planning and Implementation

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. The Sequencing of the Reform Process and the Implementation Procedures.
  2. Effectiveness, Efficiency and Affordability of the Social Protection.

The sessions are devoted to the planning and implementation of the social protection reform, focusing on the following policy dilemma: how to overhaul the outmoded institutions that deprive the economy of vital resources while maintaining the protective buffer against the new social insecurities of economic change. The sessions attempt to address the issues of the scope and scale of the Social Protection System, its costs and affordability.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. IMF, Ukraine: Budgetary Implications of Social Safety Net Options. Washington D. C., November, 1992.
  2. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 7: The Challenge of Social Protection, pages: 270 - 291; Chapter 8: Social and Labor Policy Priorities, pages 296 - 310)
  3. The World Bank, Ukraine: Employment, Social Protection and Social Spending in the Transition to a Market Economy. Washington D. C., November 1992.
  4. The World Bank, Ukraine: The Social Sectors During Transition, Washington D. C., 1993.

Recommended Readings:

  1. Decree on Targeted Cash Benefits to Low Income Persons, No. 394, Ukraine, June 14, 1993.
  2. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.

 

Week XVI Employment, Unemployment and Labour Policy Reform in Central and Eastern Europe

Lectures: 2 hours

Seminars: 2 hours

Individual Consultations: 4 hours

Plan

  1. Minimum Wages in Central and Eastern Europe during Transition.
  2. Reforming Minimum Wage Policy.
  3. Minimum Wages in Russia.
  4. Have Minimum Wages Hit Employment in the Czech Transformation?

These sessions refer to the cases from reform experiences of Central and East European countries. They focus primarily on the question of the minimum wage reform as one of the fundamental problems of the social safety net. The comparison of the CEE countries’ experiences in this area is complemented by in-depth studies of the Czech and Russian cases.

Mandatory Readings:

  1. International Labor Office, Central and Eastern European Team, The Ukrainian Challenge: Reforming Labor Market and Social Policy. Budapest: CEU Press in association with ILO-CEET, 1995. (Chapter 3: Creating Labor Market Policies, pages: 75 - 127)
  2. Standling G., Vaughan-Whitehead D., Minimum Wages in Central and Eastern Europe: from Protection to Destitution. Budapest: CEU Press, 1995
  3. UNDP, Regional Bureau for Europe and CIS, Poverty in Transition? Associated Print Production, Inc., 1998.
  4. UNICEF, Public Policy and Social Conditions: Central and Eastern Europe in Transition. Regional Monitoring Report No. 1, November 1993.


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