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   Course Title    Introduction to International Relations
Lecturer    Alexander Rudik
Institution    Dnipropetrovsk State University
Country    Russian Federation


  1. Purpose and objectives
  2. This is an introductory course on International Relations. The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the formation and evolution of the modern state system. Without going into the complex theoretical and methodological debates in the field, this course will examine and analyze the nature and characteristics of the modern international system, its challenges and alternatives. It will also focus on roles and functions of non-state actors and institutions in the international arena. Emerging global issues such as environment, international violence, terrorism, ethnic conflicts, regional conflicts, arms race, global resource management and so on will also be addressed in this course. The purpose of this course is to help students understand and analyze the complex nature of world politics, to foster skills in formulating and articulating their own visions and ideas, and to create an informed interest in Ukraine's place and role in world politics. It is expected that this course will generate enough interest and enthusiasm among students of various disciplines such as Political Science, Law, Journalism, History, Economics, Geography, Business and Sociology. This course may be useful for those who wish to pursue higher studies in politics or for those who simply want to learn about world politics.

  3. Structure and Requirements
  4. This course will comprise of lectures and seminars. There will be 27 classes (54 hours): 18 lectures (36 hours) and 9 seminars (18 hours). Seminar topics will be announced later. Students are advised to attend all lectures, to do their assigned readings regularly and actively participate in the seminars. They are also recommended to read newspapers (international news) and watch TV news. To complete this course, students will have to write a one-hour test in the classroom, a short essay (4-5 pages, preferably typed) on a contemporary issue or event of world politics (a list of suggested topics will be distributed in the class), and to write a final examination.

  5. Text books and readings
  6. The text books Global Politics by McGrew A., Lewis G. and The Globalization of World Politics. An Introduction to International Relations, ed. by Baylis J., Smith S. will be used for this course. There is a limited number of books in Department's library which will be distributed in the class. Students have to return the books at the end of the term. Additional reading materials will also be used for this course.

  7. Distribution of marks

 

In class examination

15%

Research essay

25%

Class participation

10%

Final examination

50%

 

100%

Class Schedule and Readings:

Lecture 1

Introduction to the course; General overview of the field, definition, scope and boundaries.

No assigned readings

Lecture 2

Why study World politics and how?

"Reading Packet", pp. 1-30

Lecture 3

Historical Development of the International System

"Readings packet" , pp. 31-52

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.31-107.

Lecture 4

Conceptualizing global politics

"Global Politics", Chapter 1, pp. 1-30

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.13-31.

Lecture 5

Theories of World Politics

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.107-191.

Lecture 6

International Organizations: Roles and functions

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.264-287.

Lecture 7

The United Nations

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.264-287.

Lecture 8

Great Power Rivalry and Global Conflicts

"Global Politics", Chapter 2, pp. 31-60

Lecture 9

Arms Race and Global Militarization

"Global Politics", Chapter 5, pp. 83-118

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.339-359.

Lecture 10

Regimes and Global Commons

"Global Politics", Chapter 6, pp. 118-137

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.231-249.

Lecture 11

Global Technology and Political Change in Eastern Europe

"Global Politics", Chapter 7, pp. 138-56

Lecture 12

Modernization, Globalization and Nation-state

"Global Politics", Chapter 13, pp. 253-268

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.359-374.

Lecture 13

Modernity and Universal Human Rights

"Global Politics", Chapter 14, pp. 260-297

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.469-483.

Lecture 14

Global Politics in a Transitional Era

"Global Politics", Chapter 15, pp. 312-30

"The Globalization of World Politics", pp.287-311.

Lecture 15

Ukraine and the International System

Reading materials will be assigned later.

Supplemental and Grade-raising Examinations

Students who have completed all course requirements but fail the course (i.e., receive an F) may be entitled, on application, to write a supplemental examination. The grade received on the supplemental examination will be substituted for the grade received on the final examination and the total grade recalculated accordingly.

Students who have completed all course requirements but wish to raise their grade may be entitled, on application, to write a grade-raising examination. The grade received on the grade-raising examination will be substituted for the grade received on the final examination and the total grade recalculated accordingly.

In all cases both the original grade assigned to the course and the grade assigned after a supplemental or grade-raising examination will appear on the transcript and this latter grade will be considered the official grade for the course.

Students who do not complete all course requirements will receive a grade of FNS and will be entitled neither to a supplemental examination nor to a grade-raising examination.





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