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   Course Title    Comparative History of Hungarian and Romanian Political Thought in European Context, 1800-1918
Lecturer    Kinga-Koretta Sata
Institution    Babes-Bolyai University
Country    Romania


Description of the course

The aim of the course is to give a general introduction to the two East European idioms of political thinking. The course intends to offer the students an opportunity to think about the Romanian and Hungarian tradition of political thinking both as individual traditions of political thought and in their interrelationship. The standard by which the developments in political thinking in this region will be "measured" are those of the Western (and Atlantic) tradition, which were already studied by the students in their 1st year at the university.

 

Objectives of the course

The course wishes to provide students with a comprehensive reading list making them familiar with the main ideological traditions of the region in European comparison. By the end of the course students will be able to assess the merits of all the political idioms studied and will also acquire a more general perspective for assessing every work of political thinking in these terms.

 

Evaluation

All students who participate in at least 70% of the classes are eligible to receive credit for the course. The final grade will be made up of grades given to both the class activity of the students (especially their participation in the roundtable discussions) and to the two written essays assigned to students in the following proportion:

Class activity: 40%

2 written essays of 2,000 words: 30% each

 

Details of topics and readings for each lecture

1. Ideologies in 19th century European political thought

Required readings:

John Plamenatz, Ideology (1970)

Richard H. Cox (ed.), Ideology, Politics, and Political Theory (1969)

F.M. Watkins, The Age of Ideology: Political Thought 1750 to the Present (1979)

George Lichtheim, The Concept of Ideology (1967)

2. Defining liberalism

Required readings:

John Stuart Mill, Considerations on Representative Government

Benjamin Constant, The Liberty of the Ancients and of the Moderns

Harold J. Laski, The Rise of Liberalism: The Philosophy of a Business Civilization (1936)

3. Hungarian and Romanian liberalism

Required readings:

András Gerő, Modern Hungarian Society in the Making: The Unfinished Experience (Budapest: CEU Press, 1995), Chapter 9: ‘Liberalism, Conservatism, and Political Legitimacy under the Dual Monarchy’

László Katus, ‘József Eötvös and Ferenc Deák: Laws on Nationalities,’ In Geopolitics in the Danube Region (Budapest: CEU Press, 1999), 133-160.

Paul Bödy, Joseph Eötvös and the Modernization of Hungary, 1840 1870: A Study of Ideas of Individuality and Social Pluralism in Modern Politics (Boulder: East European Monographs, 1985)

Durandin, Catherine. ‘From the Liberalism of 1848 to the "Orthodoxismul" of the 1930s—The Mutation of Romanian Identity,’ Culture and the Politics of Identity in Modern Romania. Conference, May 27-30, 1998, Elisabeta Palace, Bucharest. MS.

4. Defining conservatism

Required readings:

Edmund Burke, Reflections on the French Revolution (1790)

Alexis de Tocqueville, The Ancient Order and the Revolution

Roger Scruton, The Meaning of Conservatism (1980)

Robert A. Nisbet, Community and Power (1962)

5. Hungarian and Romanian Conservatism

Required readings:

András Gerő, Modern Hungarian Society in the Making: The Unfinished Experience (Budapest: CEU Press, 1995), Chapter 9: ‘Liberalism, Conservatism, and Political Legitimacy under the Dual Monarchy’

Iliescu, Adrian Paul. ‘19th Century Romantic and Conservative Sources of Romanian Autochtonism,’ Culture and the Politics of Identity in Modern Romania. Conference, May 27-30, 1998, Elisabeta Palace, Bucharest. MS.

6. Defining Nationalism

Required readings:

Abbé de Sičyes, What is the Third Estate?

Eric J. Hobsbawm, Nations and Nationalism since 1780: Programme, Myth, Reality (1990)

Ernest Gellner, Nations and Nationalism (1983)

Benedict Anderson, Imagined Communities (1991)

Elie Kedourie, Nationalism (1961)

7. Nationalism in Hungary and Romania

Required readings:

Peter F. Sugar, ‘The More It Changes, the More Hungarian Nationalism Remains the Same,’ Austrian History Yearbook Vol. 31 (2000), 127-155.

Hitchins, Keith. The Rumanian National Movement in Transylvania, 1780-1849 (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1969)

Fischer-Galati, Stephen. ‘Romanian Nationalism,’ Sugar, Peter F., and Ivo J. Lederer, Nationalism in Eastern Europe (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 1969), 375?

8. Defining socialism, social democracy

Required readings:

Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels, The Communist Manifesto

Daniel Bell, ‘Socialism,’ in International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences, 14:506-534 (1968)

G.D.H. Cole, A History of Socialist Thought (1953-60)

Harry W. Laidler, History of Socialism (1968)

Carl Landauer, Elizabeth Kridl Valkenier, and Hilde Stein Landauer, European Socialism (1959)

9. Socialism and social democracy in Hungary and Romania

Required readings:

Andrew C. Janos, The Politics of Backwardness in Hungary 1825-1945 (Princeton University Press, 1990)

Jowitt, Kenneth (ed.). Social Change in Romania, 1860-1940: A Debate on Development in a European Nation (Berkeley: Institute of International Studies, 1978)



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