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   Course Title    Teaching World History: Methodological Attitudes
Lecturer    Marianna G. Mouravieva
Institution    Herzen State Pedagogical University
Country    Russia


This course deals with teaching world history in Russian schools. It has two goals: helping future teachers define their methodological position in teaching world history and helping them define clearly their aims in creating their students’ identity. This problem is of crucial importance in Russia if the current situation with school reform and the post-Communist transition are considered. The course deals with analyzing the current teaching situation in Russian and especially St. Petersburg’s schools; history curricula and text-books; European and American experience in teaching world history; the consideration of methodological concepts and main problems of world history; and the problem of teaching controversial history.

The course will utilize short lectures by the instructor, work with history curricula, students composing their own curricula, group discussions and experiments in St. Petersburg’s schools in order to find out optimal ways of reforming existing methodological attitudes.

Course Requirements

The progress in the course will be evaluated as follows:

Final paper with experiment inscription: 50%

Final paper public defense: 30%

Class participation: 20%

1. The experiment will have to cover schools where students work or have practice as assistants and it will include the analysis of syllabi used in these schools, teacher’s work and methodological position (if any), the student’s methodological position (if any). As a result of the course students are expected to prepare concrete proposals for using methodological attitudes in teaching world history in the schools of St. Petersburg.

2. Final paper public defense will evaluate your capability to give public presentation of your achievements and handle with the discussions and critiques on your paper.

3. Class participation means regular attendance and in-class comments and questions related to the instructor’s weekly presentations, readings, and the students’ ongoing research.

Course Agenda

First week:

(1) Introduction: World history in the system of secondary and higher education

(2) Teaching world history in the West

(3) Comparative analysis of the teaching of World history in Russian and in the West

Reading:

  1. The Social World of Higher Education. Handbook for Teaching in a New Century/ ed. by Bernice A. Pescossolido and Ronald Aminzalde. Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press, 1999.
  2. Lazukova N. N. Soderzanie shkolnogo istoricheskogo obrazovanija v Rossii: opit proshlogo I sovremennie problemi// The Teaching of History in Contemporary Russia. Tel Aviv, 1999. P. 151-170.

Second week:

(1) Methodology of history: problem of terms

(2) Do students need methodology?

(3) Methodology and Philosophy of History at school: the problem of necessity

Reading:

  1. Evans R. In Defense of History. – L.: Granta Books, 1997.
  2. Western and Russian Historiography. Recent views/ Ed. by H. Kozicki. Houndmills: Macmillan, 1993.
  3. Problemy metodologii istorii// Novaja I noveishaja istoria. – 1996. – No. 6. – P. 60-75.

Third week:

(1) Scientific periodisation of world history and structuring of history teaching at school

(2) How to teach periodisation at school

(3) Concentric or lineal system: who is more correct?

Reading:

  1. Bentley J. U. Cross-Cultural Interaction and Periodization in World History// American History Review. - June, 1996.
  2. Green W. Periodizing in World History// History and Theory. - 1995. - Vol. 34, no. 2.
  3. Semenov U. I. Secreti Klio. Szatoe vvededie v philosophiu istorii. – Moskva, 1996.

Fourth week:

(1) The role of textbooks in teaching history

(2) The situation with textbooks for world history

(3) The use of textbooks in the lessons

Reading:

  1. Johnsen E. B. Textbooks in the Kaleidoscope. A Critical Survey of Literature and Research on Educational Texts. Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1993.
  2. Pingel F. UNESCO Guidebook on Textbook Revision. Hannver: Hahn, 1999.
  3. Shevirev A. P. Tendentsii I perspektivi razvitija uchebnoi literaturi po istorii v Rissoo// The Teaching of History in Contemporary Russia. Tel Aviv, 1999. ?. 29-41.

Fifth week:

    (1) The analysis of textbooks

    (2) Methodological attitude of the textbooks’ authors. Who writes school textbooks?

    (3) The problem of choosing the right textbook. Are there good textbooks? 

 Reading:

  1. Against bias and prejudice: the Council of Europe’s work on history teaching and history textbooks. – Strasbourg, 1995.
  2. Berghahn V. R., Schissler H. History Textbooks and Perception of the Past// Perceptions of History. International Textbook Research on Britain, Germany and the US/ Ed. by V. R. Berhahn and H. Schissler. Oxford-New-York-Hamburg: Berg, 1987. P. 1-16.
  3. Udovskaya A. Y. Problemi sovremennogo uchebnika istorii i ego mesto v obrasovatel’nom prozesse// Sovremennie podhodi v prepodavanii istorii. St.Petersburg, 1996.

Sixth week:

(1) The features of teaching different aspects and periods of history

(2) Sources in teaching history.

(3) The connection between history as academic knowledge and as school subject; teaching controversial history

Reading:

1. Black J., MacRaild D. M. Historians and sources// Black J., MacRaild D. M. Studying History. L.: Macmillan, 1997.

2. Leew-Roord van der Y. Controversial History teaching as a hazardous challenge for the European History Teacher. Paper presented at the 19th Congress of Historical Sciences. Oslo, 2000.

Seventh week:

(1) Teaching social history

(2) Teaching gender history

(3) Prospective on teaching "untraditional" fields of history

Reading:

  1. Cabrera M. A. Linguistics approach or return to subjectivism? In search of an alternative to social history// Social History. – 1999. – Vol. 24, no. 1. – P. 74-89.
  2. Scott J. Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis// Feminism and History. – Oxford, 2000. – P. 152-182.
  3. Mouravieva M. G. Gender History in the system of Russian Higher Education: the problem of necessity// Gender History: pro et contra. St. Petersburg, 2000. P. 208-221.

Required Readings:

  1. Against bias and prejudice: the Council of Europe’s work on history teaching and history textbooks. – Strasbourg, 1995.
  2. Bentley J. U. Cross-Cultural Interaction and Periodization in World History// American History Review. - June, 1996.
  3. Berghahn V. R., Schissler H. History Textbooks and Perception of the Past// Perceptions of History. International Textbook Research on Britain, Germany and the US/ Ed. by V. R. Berhahn and H. Schissler. Oxford-New-York-Hamburg: Berg, 1987. P. 1-16.
  4. Black J., MacRaild D. M. Historians and sources// Black J., MacRaild D. M. Studying History. L.: Macmillan, 1997.
  5. Brace G. Criteria for selecting curriculum content and the balance between local, regional, national and world history – the example of the UK, and, in particular, Wales. – Suzdal, 1996.
  6. Cabrera M. A. Linguistics approach or return to subjectivism? In search of an alternative to social history// Social History. – 1999. – Vol. 24, no. 1. – P. 74-89.
  7. Green W. Periodizing in World History// History and Theory. - 1995. - Vol. 34, no. 2.
  8. Evans R. In Defense of History. – L.: Granta Books, 1997.
  9. Historical Controversies and Historians/ Ed. by W. Lamont. L.: University College of London Press, 1998.
  10. Johnsen E. B. Textbooks in the Kaleidoscope. A Critical Survey of Literature and Research on Educational Texts. Oslo: Scandinavian University Press, 1993.
  11. Lazukova N. N. Soderzanie shkolnogo istoricheskogo obrazovanija v Rossii: opit proshlogo I sovremennie problemi// The Teaching of History in Contemporary Russia. Tel Aviv, 1999. P. 151-170.
  12. Leew-Roord van der Y. Controversial History teaching as a hazardous challenge for the European History Teacher. Paper presented at the 19th Congress of Historical Sciences. Oslo, 2000.
  13. Low-Beer A. The Council of Europe and School History. – Strasbourg, 1997.
  14. Mandelbaum M. The Anatomy of Historical Knowledge. Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1977.
  15. Mouravieva M. G. Gender History in the system of Russian Higher Education: the problem of necessity// Gender History: pro et contra. St. Petersburg, 2000. P. 208-221.
  16. Pingel F. UNESCO Guidebook on Textbook Revision. Hannver: Hahn, 1999.
  17. Problemy metodologii istorii// Novaja I noveishaja istoria. – 1996. – No. 6. – P. 60-75.
  18. Scott J. Gender: A Useful Category of Historical Analysis// Feminism and History. – Oxford, 2000. – P. 152-182.
  19. Semenov U. I. Secreti Klio. Szatoe vvededie v philosophiu istorii. – Moskva, 1996.
  20. Shennan M. Teaching about Europe. – Cassell, 1991.
  21. Shevirev A. P. Tendentsii I perspektivi razvitija uchebnoi literaturi po istorii v Rissoo// The Teaching of History in Contemporary Russia. Tel Aviv, 1999. ?. 29-41.
  22. Slater J. Teaching History in the New Europe. – Cassell, 1995.
  23. The Social World of Higher Education. Handbook for Teaching in a New Century/ ed. by Bernice A. Pescossolido and Ronald Aminzalde. Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press, 1999.
  24. Stradling R. Mutual understanding and the teaching of European History: challenges, problems and approaches. – Strasbourg, 1996. (Council of Europe)
  25. Stradling R. The European Content of the School History Curriculum. – Strasbourg, 1995.
  26. Western and Russian Historiography. Recent views/ Ed. by H. Kozicki. Houndmills: Macmillan, 1993.
  27. Udovskaya A. Y. Problemi sovremennogo uchebnika istorii i ego mesto v obrasovatel’nom prozesse// Sovremennie podhodi v prepodavanii istorii. St.Petersburg, 1996.


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