EARLY MODERN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY
Ferenc Houranszky
Term: Fall 1994
Faculty of Political Science, Budapest
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY



Course Summary:

The principal aim of the seminar is to give an overview on some of the most important works of the early modem political philosophy. The selection of the texts is based on their relevance to the formation of the modem political science. Special attention will be paid to the classics of liberal thought .

Syllabus:

Sept. 6: The history of political philosophy and its relevance to modem political science.
Introductory lecture

Sept. 13: Methodological problems in the history of political thought.
Introductory lecture

Sept. 20: The renaissance and the revival of ancient political thought
Lecture

Sept. 22: Machiavelli: The Prince
Seminar

Sept. 27: The concept of natural rights and the rise of modem sciences Lecture
Lecture

Sept. 29: Hobbes: Leviathan: Introduction, Chapter 1-10
Seminar

Oct. 4: The concept of sovereignty
Lecture

Oct. 6: Hobbes: Leviathan: Chapter 13-21
Seminar

Oct. 11: The historical context of Locke's political thought
Lecture

Oct. 13: Lock: Second Treatise on Government: The problem of state of nature
Seminar /

Oct. 18: Second Treatise of Government The consent theory of political obligations ;/
Seminar

Oct. 20: Locke-Letter Concerning Toleration
Seminar

Oct. 25: Summary of the first part of the course
Seminar

Oct. 27: Mid-term examination

Nov. 1: Hume's moral philosophy
Lecture

Nov. 3: Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature . Book II. Part. II.
Seminar

Nov. 8: Rousseau and the problem of enlightenment
Lecture

Nov. 10: Rousseau on the origin of inequality
Lecture

Nov. 15: Rousseau. The Social Contract : Chapter 1-2.
Seminar

Nov. 17: Rousseau -The Social Contract :Chapter 3-4
Seminar

Nov. 22: Kants moral philosophy
Lecture

Nov. 29: The origins of utilitarian thought
Lecture

Dec. 1: J.S. Mill: On Liberty: Chapter 1-3
Seminar

Dec. 6: Summary of the course

Dec. 8: Presentation of the final essays

EVALUATION:
Students are required to follow regularly the lectures and to participate actively in the seminars . The evaluation will be based on the activity during seminars, the mid-term in-class paper and the final essay in the following proportion: activity: 30%; mid-term paper: 30%; final essay: 40%.
1. Final essays must be handed by the last day of the first trimester.



Digitized version prepared by the Curiculum Resource Center (CRC)
CEU Budapest, Hungary
Revised: May 1996

Hou_EarlyMo.F94PS.v3

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