STRATEGIC STUDIES: FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS
Stefano Guzzini
Term: Fall 1993
Faculty of Political Sciences, Budapest
CENTRAL EUROPEAN UNIVERSITY



Syllabus:

1. General Introduction

2 - 6. DETERRENCE: THEORY AND PRACTICE

2. Introduction to strategy/deterrence
Required Readings:
Lawrence Freedman, The Evolution of Nuclear Strategy (London: Macmillan, 1983) [There is a newer edition].
Tom Schelling, The Strategy of Conflict (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1980), esp. pp. 3-80.

3. Superpower strategies: US
Required Readings:
John Lewis Gaddis, Strategies of Containment (Oxford: Oxford University Press,1982), chapters 4-8 (pp. 89-273).

4. Superpower strategies: USSR
Required Readings:
Michael McGwire: Perestroika and Soviet National Security (Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 1991).

5. Middle-power strategies: France and nuclear proliferation
Required Readings:
Lothar Ruehl, La politique militaire de la V. Republique (Paris: Presses de la Fondation Nationale de Sciences Politiques, 1976).

6. Case study: The INF deployment in Europe
Required Readings:
Susanne Peters, The Germans and the D9F Missiles. Getting Their Way in NATO's Strategy of Flexible Response (Baden-Baden: Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft, 1990).

7 - 11. FOREIGN POLICY ANALYSIS

7. Bureaucratic Politics Readings: Graham T. Allison, Essence of Decision (Boston: Little, Brown, 1971).

8. Case study: The Cuba crisis (revisited)
Required Readings:
Stephen Krasner, "Are Bureaucracies Important? (Or Allison's Wonderland)", Foreign Policy, vol. 7 (1972), pp. 159-179.
Steve Smith, "Allison and the Cuban Missile Crisis: A Review of the Bureaucratic Politics Model of Foreign Policy Decision Making", Millennium vol. 19, no. 1 (1980), pp. 21-40.
Jonathan Bendor and Thomas H. Hammond, "Rethinking Allison's Models", American Political Science Review, vol. 86, no. 2 (June 1992).

9-10. Cognitive approaches: belief system, cognitive map, operational code
Readings:
Alexander George, "The Operational Code", International Studies Quarterly, vol. 69 (June 1969), pp. 190-222.
Ole Holsti, "Foreign Policy Formation Viewed Cognitively", in Robert Axelrod (ed.) Structure of Decision: The Cognitive Maps of Political Elites (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1976), pp. 18-54.
Phil Williams, Crisis Management (London: Martin Robertson, 1976).
John Steinbrunner, The Cybernetic Theory of Decision (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1976), chapters 1-5.
Steve Smith, "Belief systems and the Study of International Relations", in Steve Smith and Richard Little (eds) Belief Systems & International Relations (Oxford Basil Blackwell, 1988), pp. 11-36.
Richard Little, "Belief systems and the Study of International Relations", in Steve Smith and Richard Little (eds) Belief Systems & International Relations (Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1988), pp. 37-56.

11 - 12. THE ORIGINS OF WAR-DEBATE
Required Readings:
Bruce Bueno de Mesquita, "The contribution of expected utility theory to the study of international conflict", Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 629-652.
Robert Gilpin, "The Theory of Hegemonic War", Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 18, no.4, pp. 591-613.
Robert Jervis, "War and Misperception", Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 18, no.4, pp. 675-700
Kenneth Waltz, "The Origins of War in Neorealist Theory", Journal of Interdisciplinary History, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 615-628.
Hidemi Suganami, "Bringing Order to the Causes of War Debates" Millennium, vol. 19, no. 1 (1990), pp. 19-35.
Michael Nicholson, "The conceptual bases of "The war trap"', Journal of Conflict Resolution, vol. 31, no. 2 (1987), pp. 346-369.

The Courses are organised in three different parts. Every student is expected to make either an oral presentation or a take-home exam on one of these parts.

1. Class Participation (20%). Students are expected to read and to be prepared to discuss weekly assignments
2. Class Presentation for one of the seminars (20%).
3. Take-home exams (25% and 35%) of the three offered for lectures 5, 9, 13.
4. Optional: There is the possibility to write a long seminar paper (also during the vacations) on a subject of the student's choice. The grades will be only counted (and added to the others), if they are better than satisfactory.



Digitized version prepared by the Curriculum Resource Center (CRC)
CEU Budapest, Hungary
Revised: May 1996

Guz_Strateg.F93PS.v3

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